BLACK HISTORY MONTH PROFILE: Euphemia Lofton Haynes

Dr. Euphemia Lofton Haynes was the first African American woman to earn a Ph.D. in Mathematics. “Martha Euphemia Lofton was born in Washington, D.C. in 1890, the first child and only daughter of Dr. Willian Lofton and Mrs. Lavinia Day Lofton. Her father, Dr. William S. Lofton was a renown African-American dentist and financier in …

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BLACK HISTORY MONTH PROFILE: Timothy Thomas Fortune

Timothy Thomas Fortune was born a slave in Marianna, Florida, to Sarah Jane and Emanuel Fortune on October 3, 1856. He attended Howard University from 1876 to 1877. He was trained as a printer and traveled to New York where he was hired by “The New York Sun” in 1878 and later promoted to the …

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The Cherokees Free Their Slaves

The status of the slaves of the Cherokee Nation has been in dispute for a long time. Following on the heels of the Emancipation Proclamation, in February 1863 the Cherokee Nation declared that all slaves within its limits were “forever free.” In 1983, the descendants of these slaves, known as the Cherokee Freedmen, were removed …

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BLACK HISTORY MONTH PROFILE: Septima Poinsette Clark

Septima Poinsette Clark (1898-1987), an educator and civil and human rights activist, is often referred to as the “Grandmother of the Civil Rights Movement.” One of her greatest contributions to the movement was the development of citizenship schools throughout the South. From 1962 to 1964 she trained more than 10,000 teachers for the schools and …

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BLACK HISTORY MONTH PROFILE: Frances Ellen Watkins Harper

Frances Ellen Watkins Harper (September 24, 1825 – February 22, 1911) was an African-American abolitionist, poet and author. Born free in Baltimore, Maryland, she had a long and prolific career, publishing her first book of poetry at age 20 and her first novel, the widely praised “Iola Leroy,” at age 67. “Born in Baltimore, poet, …

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U.S. Census Bureau Black History Month Feature for Feb. 1

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 1: BLACK HISTORY MONTH Audio: Black History Month Profile America for the first day of Black History Month. February is a time to recall and honor the many positive contributions to our nation made by the people of African descent. Started as a special week 84 years ago by historian Carter G. Woodson, …

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Black golf pioneer Powell dies

CANTON, Ohio – Bill Powell, the first African American to build, own and operate a golf course, died Thursday. He was 93. The PGA of America said Powell died at Aultman Hospital in Canton following complications from a stroke. “Bill Powell will forever be one of golf’s most unforgettable American heroes,” PGA of America president …

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Preservationists fight to properly document slave cemetery

Race against time Preservationists want to document plantation slave cemeteries before history is lost By Prentiss Findlay Eugene Frazier and Thomas Johnson surveyed a forest of graves at a hidden cemetery on James Island where they said more than 200 people are laid to rest. Most of the deceased are in unmarked graves. Many of …

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Genealogy Web site adds slave manifests, letters

By JANET McCONNAUGHEY The Associated Press NEW ORLEANS (AP) – Records of more than 30,000 slaves shipped to New Orleans, copies of more than 20,000 letters to and from Abraham Lincoln, and records of 4.2 million Civil War soldiers are going online for the 200th anniversary of Lincoln’s birth. Most will be available only to …

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Integrated Town that Predates Civil War Earns Landmark Status

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. – A remote western Illinois field could someday yield tourists instead of crops, adding to the state’s legacy of racial equality that already includes Abraham Lincoln and the nation’s first black president.Once an integrated town that flourished decades before the Civil War broke the grip of slavery, the lost community’s potential as a …

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